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Diamond’s thesis in collapse

At a Glance In Guns, Germs, and Steel, anthropologist Jared Diamond explains why some societies diamond’s thesis in collapse more materially successful than others. He attributes societal success to geography, immunity to germs, food production, the domestication of animals, and use of steel. Farming and domesticating animals provide social stability that is lacking in hunter-gatherer societies. Labor specialization enables certain groups to develop weapons.

Major portions of Eurasia had a natural advantage in developing agriculture and domesticating animals because of geography and the presence of plants and animals that could be easily domesticated. The landmass of Eurasia, laid out on an east-west axis, allowed for the sharing of crops, animals, and ideas. The Americas, stretched out on a north-south axis, traverse various climate zones and geographic boundaries that discourage trade. The diversity and density of Eurasian populations created an immunity to germs that would later wipe out the more isolated populations of the Americas.

Download Guns, Germs, and Steel Study Guide Subscribe now to download this study guide, along with more than 30,000 other titles. Winner of the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction, Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel was also, somewhat surprisingly, a national best-seller. Although the book has raised a few points of controversy among scientists, it also has gained widespread praise. Some scientists argue against Diamond’s thesis that geography and environment are the most important factors in shaping the world as modern humans know it. But most critics praise Diamond for the task he successfully took upon himself, which was to answer a very complex question. Diamond searched for an answer by examining millions of years of history, mapping out the migrations of early humans from Africa to Eurasia, from eastern Asia to the Pacific Ocean islands, and from Siberia to the North and South American continents.

He follows humans as they evolve biologically, and then he concentrates on specific representative societies to illustrate his findings. To define the differences between developing cultures, Diamond emphasizes the effects of food production, writing, technology, government, and religion. Then he demonstrates, in his opinion, why the differences among various cultures occurred. Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel opens with a prologue in which the author presents a question from a New Guinean politician and friend named Yali: why were Europeans able to conquer so many other societies around the world? This question, in the past, has often been answered in terms of genetics, a belief that Diamond sets out to disprove. Societies become more stable as they move from hunting and gathering to cultivating crops and raising domestic animals.

What then inevitably follows is the development of specialized labor groups as well as the establishment of hierarchies in ruling parties. Populations thrive under these conditions, and in time empires rise. The stability provides farming societies with powerful advantages over nomadic hunter-gatherer groups, which are forced to roam the countryside in search of food. Major portions of the Eurasian area, Diamond points out, had a natural advantage in agriculture because of the presence of plants and animals that were easily domesticated. Not only did this allow food surpluses to develop, but it also enabled crops such as cotton, flax, and hemp to be easily processed into clothing, blankets, nets, and ropes. The entire section is 806 words. You’ll also get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and 300,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

The answer to this can be found in Chapter 12. There, Diamond tells us that some people did not develop writing because they did not need it. Summarize Yali’s question from Guns, Germs, and Steel. Yali’s question is very short and does not really need to be summarized. In the Prologue, Diamond gives us Yali’s question in its entirety. According to Diamond, there are a number of qualities that an animal species must have if it is to be domesticated.

What is Diamond’s one sentence summary of Guns, Germs, and Steel? The answer to this can be found in the Prologue of Guns, Germs, and Steel. Specifically, it can be found towards the bottom of p. 25 in the paperback edition of the book. According to Guns, Germs, and Steel, what made the Europeans accidental conquerors? According to Diamond, the Europeans were accidental conquerors because they got the agents of conquest essentially by accident.

Our summaries and analyses are written by experts, and your questions are answered by real teachers. At a Glance In Guns, Germs, and Steel, anthropologist Jared Diamond explains why some societies are more materially successful than others. He attributes societal success to geography, immunity to germs, food production, the domestication of animals, and use of steel. Farming and domesticating animals provide social stability that is lacking in hunter-gatherer societies.

Labor specialization enables certain groups to develop weapons. Major portions of Eurasia had a natural advantage in developing agriculture and domesticating animals because of geography and the presence of plants and animals that could be easily domesticated. The landmass of Eurasia, laid out on an east-west axis, allowed for the sharing of crops, animals, and ideas. The Americas, stretched out on a north-south axis, traverse various climate zones and geographic boundaries that discourage trade. The diversity and density of Eurasian populations created an immunity to germs that would later wipe out the more isolated populations of the Americas.

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