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Create an outline for this thesis statement

The number one college bound web site on the Internet. By the time high school graduation comes around students should have acquired a solid working understanding of the basic essay structure. Unfortunately, not all high school English departments are created equal, and some students may find the prospect of writing their college admissions essay more than a little daunting. But if we take some time to review the basic essay structure, and consider how to approach your admissions essay, you will be well on create an outline for this thesis statement way to a successful submission.

The standard essay format that you have been writing in high school, and will be expected to write in college, has a basic structure of five paragraphs. A standard essay consists of an introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs and a final paragraph presenting your conclusion. Switching to a paperless office model will not only save the company money, it will also reduce wastage and create a more efficient workspace while helping the environment. Once again, the traditional model includes three paragraphs for developing your argument but this is not a hard and fast rule.

As you progress in your essay writing while at college you will find much longer essay forms will be needed. When you are preparing the outline for your essay, you will want to briefly jot down the supporting points for each paragraph, and list examples or research points you want to include that will prove your original thesis statement. When you look over your outline, you should recognize the skeleton of your finished essay. The standard format for an essay’s conclusion is to restate the thesis, and then concisely demonstrate how your supporting points have proven your original assertion. It is important that the conclusion of your essay be strong and definitive. Preparing for your college admissions essay may seem daunting at first.

But with an understanding of an essay’s basic structure, and a detailed outline, you will be able to present the college admissions board with a cohesive essay that will impress the judges and move your application at the top of the acceptance pile. About a month ago, I promised to follow up my blog post about informal outlines with one about formal outlines. It’s taken me a while but here is that subsequent blog post. Never let it be said I am not a woman of my word! When a teacher or supervisor asks you for a formal outline, she or he is requesting a document that has very specific formatting rules. Some rules will differ according to the kind of project you’re working on and any specific instructions given to you, but there are a few general rules you should be aware of that govern all formal outlines.

The higher the heading level, the more general the statement. Use either sentences or phrases in your outline, but not both. Items must be in parallel structure. First of all, make sure that the content of your outline is logical before you start nitpicking on the format. Do the headings make sense in the order you have placed them? Are items that are closely related placed together for a more natural flow of ideas? Don’t let this rule confuse you.

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